Willamette National Forest (Detroit Lake Area) – Tumble Lake

Tumble Lake

TUMBLE LAKE

SEPTEMBER 1, 2013

INFO:  From the Oregon Hike Book by Sean Patrick Hill. From the edge of Detroit Reservoir, the Tumble Ridge Trail heads straight into the neighboring mountains, climbing steeply to the spire of Needle Rock and the vista of Dome Rock. Hidden up Tumble Creek is Tumble Lake, with a waterfall. Though you could hike in this way, there is an easier point of entry that makes for a quicker hike to these sights (which is what Scott and I did and this review is based on that direction to this easier hike). From the upper trailhead on Road 2223, go in 0.4 mile to a junction. To access Dome Rock, go left 0.5 mile to the 4,869-foot peak. To access Tumble Lake, go right at this first junction crossing a meadow down into a gully for 1.2 miles to the shore. Follow the shore to the left 0.3 mile to see the outlet creek and waterfall.

DIRECTIONS:  Drive 50 miles east of Salem on OR22 to Detroit Lake. Just before the Breitenbush River turn left on French Creek Road 2223 and go 4.2 miles to a fork at pavement’s end. (The road will initially split before the 4.2 miles and make sure to veer to the left. The road is super narrow so beware of oncoming cars/trucks) This is a picture of a pretty narrow part. My car (Honda Accord) is not that wide but it sure felt like it was a tight squeeze. Road to TumbleLake

At pavement’s end, fork left onto Road 2223 for 3.9 miles. It’s a good idea to watch your miles because there are no trail mark. We just found it because there were cars parked on the road and we saw a trail on the left. Permits are not required and parking and access is free.

JENN’S VIEW: Scott and I really enjoyed this trail. We have a 12-13 year old German Short-haired Pointer and a 6 year old tiny Maltese with us and they did better on the trail than I did! The climb back up was pretty brutal because it was a pretty steep incline. When we hit the lake, it was absolutely beautiful. So green and blue and very clear. Wish we had brought a raft to slowly drift around. Went looking for the waterfall but didn’t find it. I was a little bummed about that but give me a great reason to go back and do Dome Creek and then back to Tumble Lake. I was thinking of camping here next year. Scott promised to pack everything back up when we leave. Tee hee, I’m such a woos. I would say Pamelia Lake is prettier. You can get really pretty pictures with the mountain reflecting in the water. It’s flat and easier to get in to and tons of trails to hike around. Only problem with Pamelia Lake is that there is a limited access fee (not much $5 and can be ordered online) and must have a wilderness pass (another $5, I believe). Check that blog out here:  http://www.oregonhike.org/2011/06/mt-jefferson-pamelia-lake-9.html

The trail starts off with a small climb up. No big deal. The dogs were so excited to hit the trail. Too funny.  Scott being a “poser”. hahahahahaha….

Scott Wenger PoserThe first 0.4 miles is a steady climb up and you will actually see the sign to Tumble Lake. You will also see pretty cool rock spires (well that’s what I call them) and beautiful trees – Don’t ask, I normally don’t know what “type” of trees. It probably says it in my guide book but it’s late and I really don’t feel like getting out of my bed to check. LOL. Going to the left will take you to Dome Rock. We will hit that area next time  because its only 0.5 miles to the peak – I think. Then head down towards Tumble Lake after our OOOHHHH and AHHHH’s at Dome Rock.

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The next obstacle we faced was which way do we go? Follow what looks like a dry river bank. DO NOT FOLLOW THE TRAIL ON THE LEFT THAT LOOKS LIKE A TRAIL! Nor follow the flags that are on that trail. Scott and I sorta followed the flags and we eventually found our way out but we ended up on that dry river bed.

TumbleLake13Scott trying to figure out which flags to follow. We finally figured it out but it would have been easier to just follow the dry river bed!

_DSC0008After making our way out and on the right path, the climb down was a little hurtful on my poor little knees. It’s slippery too with loose rocks so be careful!

Tumble Lake

Eventually you will hit what my book calls a “meadow”. I guess. It’s a field of raspberry or some type of “prickly” bushes. Be careful – it hurts. I had to turn my capri pants back to regular pants. Man, I love those pants! Poor Scott was wearing shorts.

Tumble Lake

 After that, it’s a short walk to the lake. I just kept looking up thinking to myself how hard it is to climb back up! GRRRR, it’s gonna be brutal but after reaching the lake – the excitement of making plans to camp, raft, hike, etc all came about when we hit the lake. Sam, who is OLD OLD OLD dog, hates the water – actually jumped in the water. He loved it!

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We saw someone camping up near the rocks and one guy fishing in the lake on the other side. We didn’t stay too long because we had to get to a party that night.  We will definitely be back and with more time. Did I mention – the hike back is B.R.U.T.A.L.!

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Wouldn’t be a post without a picture of the one and only – MEEEEE!

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Oregon Coast – Tillamook County – Clarence Creek Falls

CLARENCE CREEK FALLS

APRIL 22. 2012

Info: From the Waterfall Northwest Society (http://www.waterfallsnorthwest.com/nws/falls.php?num=4087) The Forest Service has advertised Clarence Creek Falls by sign along the Nestucca River Road. What neither the Forest Service has done, nor does the book “A Waterfall Lover’s Guide to the Pacific Northwest”, is identify which of the two waterfalls along Clarence Creek is intended this designation. Topographic maps delimitate the different falls, but the lower of the two falls is near impossible to see, especially if not watching carefully. The lower falls consists of three sliding steps, totaling about 60 feet. A significant amount of foreshortening doesn’t allow the falls’ size to truly be illustrated, and a twist in the gorge at the falls obstructs the upper tiers from being seen from all but a few perspectives. Because the upper and lower falls of Clarence Creek are located within about 500 feet of one another, I’m designating them as lower and upper. Unfortunately neither fall is easy to see because there are no developed trails or viewpoints, this being the vastly more difficult to see.
 
Directions:
  1. On Hwy 101 south of Tillamook enter the town of Beaver.
  2. Near milepost 80 turn onto the road signed as “Upper Nestucca River Recreation Area” and “Blaine”.
    Note the mileposts on this road as you travel.
  3. After 6.7 miles you’ll reach the town of Blaine. Where the road branches
    note the sign stating “Carlton”. Head straight towards Carlton on Road 858.
  4. At milepost 11.7 look for a left turn on a road with a “Road Closed” sign.
    You will note the following sign for Road 8300

Jenn’s View: This fall would be so amazing to photograph if only I was brave enough to climb down. It would be better if I had rope and someone with me to climb down. I know EXACTLY where I would set up my tripod and take 1000+ pictures to get that ONE great picture. LOL. Now, the directions in the  book SUCKS! I was lost and missed my turn by 10+ miles! I ended up in some National Forest (probably Suislaw National Forest) and man did I need to go Pee. Awww Geez. Who reads this anyways?   So, not really sure where I was. I think I saw Forest Road 8838 (?) so I know I was waaaayyy off. I didn’t see anyone on the road so I couldn’t ask. I ended up driving on some gravel road and there was a fork in the road so I turned around and headed back. When I was coming back on the road and back tracking, I saw a sign that said Clarence Creek Falls. I remembered that was very close to the falls I really wanted to go to – Niagara Falls. I turned on to that road.  Its Forest Road 8300 – you are on the right road!

The next sign is on the road and it’s pretty much a warning. Just remember there are traps and your dogs can get seriously hurt.

Tillamook - Clarence Creek Falls

I couldn’t get a picture of the falls. I drove up and down trying to figure out how to get down there but nope, nada. ANYONE ACTUALLY GOT DOWN HERE???? Well, let me know! There has been people who got a shot of this. Here is one by Bryan Swan.

Tillamook Oregon, Suislaw national Forest

If anyone can get a shot like this….Please Please Please comment and let me know where I can find your pictures!

Columbia Gorge – Latourell Falls

LATOURELL FALLS LOOP

MAY 24, 2012

Info: Taken from the Friends of the Columbia Gorge website (http://gorgefriends.org/display.php?modin=51&uid=4886) Beginning from the Latourell Falls Trailhead, follow the paved viewpoint trail up to the viewpoint. From here, a dirt path leads away to the left, steeply around the basin. Look for side views of the falls, particularly in the winter, when the trees have lost their leaves. The trail climbs for about 1/3 of a mile to a bench at the top of the falls.

The main trail continues southward beside the creek. The trail here is rocky in places and the undergrowth next to the trail is very thick, blocking most views in the summer. The trail crosses four pleasant, small wooden bridges and then comes to Upper Latourell Falls. This waterfall is a two tiered drop: first a block fall that’s almost hidden and then a plunge into a pool. The trail crosses Latourell Creek at the base of the falls and heads back down the west side of Henderson creek. Follow the trail to the Historic Columbia River Highway.

Hikers can return to the trailhead by hiking across the bridge, but there’s more trail fun to be had. Across the road, there’s an old set of stairs that start a trail dropping down into Guy Talbot Park. The trail drops down to a parking area with picnic tables. From here another paved trail heads back under the highway bridge to the base of Latourell Falls. The bridge, dating from 1914, is interesting in its own right, with special lightweight construction due to the unstable soils in the area. At the falls, the lichen-covered columnar basalt formations around the falls steal the show. From here, it’s a short, paved, uphill hike to the parking lot.

Directions: From Portland, drive east on I-84 to Exit 28 (Bridal Veil). Turn Right on the Historic Highway and drive 2.8 miles to the Latourell Falls Parking lot on the left. From the east, take exit 35 (Ainsworth Park). Drive 10.8 miles west on the Historic Highway to the same lot.

Jenn’s View: Since this was the only “TRUE” hike I did, I really enjoyed this one. It was about 2+ miles round trip and I think I took a wrong turn somewhere because I didn’t end up at the parking lot that I originally started in. I wasn’t too far off though :). Great hike for the family. I saw little tiny kids on the trail. They have this rated as moderate and I would have to agree at the beginning of the trail. It does “SLOWLY” climb up so not too hard or strenuous.  Meaning, slow elevation gain. Take the kids and the dogs! Dogs must be on a leash. I didn’t get great pictures. The lighting was off – too much sun. The best place that I had a blast taking pictures was Bridal Veil. I am soooo not a professional or even an amateur, I just take pics to add to the blogs.

From the parking lot, you climb up the paved path to a viewing area of Latourell Falls. Talked to a family who had a young German Shepherd and three kids.  One of the kids bent down in front of Shadowlynn’s face and my dog jumped up to either lick her or just “bonk” her on her nose. I was busy talking with the mom and not paying attention to her little girl. Gave her a bloody nose and felt soooo bad!

Please please please, educate your children on the importance of NOT going up to a dog without owner’s consent or without owner’s supervision. OR bending down and being eye level to a stranger’s dog.

(BTW, the”professional picture above to the right here was not taken by me. It is from the Friends of the Columbia Gorge website)

From the viewpoint, there is a trail that starts the slow climb up. I think that was probably the hardest part of the trail besides all the deep mud puddles you encounter on the trail.

I came to the falls and loved how “neon green” the moss was next to the water. Had to take a picture, of course.

Climbing up the hill, I saw a couple of people on this log taking pictures of the river/creek/stream so I patiently waited my turn and got on that log. It freaked me out because it was quite slippery and my stupid dog kept running back and forth on the log with me on it! She has absolutely no manners and will knock you off first chance she gets because you are in HER way.

I didn’t get any good shots from this bridge, probably because I wouldn’t walk all the way across fearing my dog would knock me off. Here is what I managed to get. Nothing spectacular.

Hiked up a bit more and decided to stop and eat my Subway Sammich. MMMM yummy… 9 grain Honey Oat with Turkey and cheddar cheese. Add spinach, tomatoes, jalapenos, a little bit of mayo and mustard and got myself a awesome lunch. Shared the meat with Shadowlynn, of course. While sitting there, I heard a crack and large branches from the tree next to me fell. Didn’t hurt me or the dog but that was our cue to go. Came to the first bridge of the hike. You encounter a few.

It was so muddy on the trail. My poor shoes. Someone asked me (Scott’s Aunt Cathy) what shoes I normally wear and for the love of God, I couldn’t remember. Probably because I was nervous meeting the family for the first time. They are KEENS! That’s right! Need to do a product review on those babies here soon. I didn’t get a shot of the little cascading stream at the bridge. I figure I get enough of those. LOL

We finally get to the upper part and we have Upper Latourell Falls. Real pretty but the spray from the water and the amount of people on the trail made it quite difficult to get a shot.

 

I moved further down and across the bridge but someone with a camera/tripod was out taking pictures. He was patiently awaiting for people to pass. Nice equipment but I think he gave up to trying to take a picture of this fall. He kept wiping his camera lens.

While I was waiting for the people to pass, I found a little stream and started taking pictures.

Heading down, I found these flowers I would love to add to my potted plants. Not really sure what they are but they awfully pretty. While going down, I came to a fork in the road. I did take the path to the right thinking I would end at the bottom path and back to the highway, but I swore that path ended so I climbed back up and took the other path. Hmmm…It was a bigger path! Every now and then you would get a break in the tree line so you can see the Gorge but the trees are pretty big that it was hard to see. Like I said at the beginning, I didn’t end up at the parking lot. I did however end up NEAR the parking lot, close to the bridge.

Overall, I think this hike was pretty nice. We got a great break from the winter weather we have been having to enjoy and soak up the sun. Even though my allergies were killing me, I still had a marvelous time!

It wouldn’t be my blog without a picture of me! he he or Shadowlynn

Opal Creek Wilderness – Henline Falls Trail

HENLINE FALLS

May 30, 2011

Info: Taken from the US Forest Service (http://www.fs.usda.gov) The trail meanders through young Douglas-fir and Western Hemlock forest. The trail ends at Henline Falls. Here you will find remnants of old mining from the 1930’s. A mine adit was built into the solid rock wall and goes back in about 1500 feet.

Directions: From Salem, travel East on Hwy 22 to milepost 23 at the Swiss Village Restaurant. Turn left on North Fork Road, which is marked “Little North Santiam Recreation Area”. Travel about 19 miles to forest road 2207 junction, continue past this junction for ¼ mile. Trailhead is on the left side.
This also provides access to Ogle Mountain Trail #3357 where it intersects with Henline Falls trail.

Jenn’s View: I really do like this hike. It’s real easy and quick so if I have the urge to do something close, I can go here. I would probably head up to Silver Creek Falls but it’s normally crowded so I don’t go there as much. Plus, if you are courageous enough you can go in the mine…I wouldn’t suggest going pass the barrier though. It freaked me out! All I can imagine is something crawling on the ceiling and then grab me and pull me in!

The first time I did this was with my daughter, Makaila Hunter.  She’s so funny and fun to hike with. Of course, I brought Shadowlynn with us and she was sporting her wonderful doggie backpack that carries nothing in it. It’s terrible to hold anything in it, I just use so I can spot her. 🙂 The Dog

You go through the woods and it’s a pretty flat area to hike into so the hike was pretty easy. Most of the pictures taken were when we reached the falls.

A couple of pictures of us. It wouldn’t be my blog without a picture of me :)!

We did manage to do another hike very close by. These pictures were taken with my camera phone and my ELPH camera. Unfortunately, my little ELPH broke.

Taken at river levelIt's Jenn

REVISIT: March 11, 2012
So, silly me decided to once again go hiking and be unprepared for snow. Gosh darn snow! Besides, Scott Wenger had my snow pants when we went skiing that last time I was in Sisters, Oregon. EEEK. First time skiing since 6th grade. Quite comical on skis. I think I should invest in snow shoes.

Here was my drive in. I drive a 4 door Honda Accord so any snow – blah for my car. I love my little car especially now that the gas price is over $4.00 a gallon so my SUV has to wait once again.

Sorry it’s such a dark picture but the settings of my camera were way off and I forgot to adjust them before taking the pictures.

There was another car parked in front of the sign so I know that someone else was on the trail. You would normally do the self issued pass that is located on the sign in the little box but there were none so I didn’t fill it out. Next time, I should leave a small pad of paper and see who would write on it to tell me about the trail. hmmmm…. SCIENCE EXPERIMENT!

To Henline Falls and Ogle Mountain

Most of the trail was covered in snow. Man, it would have been nice to have my snow pants, just saying….

You come to a fork in the road. To the right, that’s the trail to Ogle Mountain. I wouldn’t take that road just quite yet. It’s long and bit more difficult.

You know when you are on the right track when you come to the sign to Henline Falls

When you are on the trail, you will start hearing the water… At the end of the path is good ol’ Henline Falls

Wouldn’t be a blog without a picture of me….Isn’t that what I normally say?

Santiam State Forest – Abiqua Falls (#19 )

ABIQUA FALLS
Click on the picture to make it bigger!
October 23, 2011

Info:  (http://www.waterfallsnorthwest.com/nws/falls.php?num=4437) Abiqua Falls is a near-perfect free-falling waterfall of 92 feet in height set amid a spectacular basaltic amphitheater, framed by some of the best examples of columnar jointing that can be found in western Oregon. That the bedrock is basaltic has allowed various shades of moss and lichen to flourish in the canyon – with one section of the walls stained a bright orangeish-red by the growth in a similarly unique fashion as Latourell Falls in the Columbia River Gorge. The falls were the site of what was at one point thought to be a world record for the tallest waterfall run in a kayak. The kayakers who established the feat measured the falls at 101 feet tall, which differs from the measurement taken when reviewed for this database by 9 feet (though this is probably within an acceptable margin of error given the methods used, but it did not look like 100 feet to my eye). Abiqua Falls lies on land owned by the Mount Angel Abbey (rather than the surrounding Silver Falls Tree Farm as initially believed), who have graciously allowed public access to the falls. Between April and July of 2010 they had posted the land because of concerns about liability but as of the beginning of July 2010, they have once again opened the falls to access. Please remember to be a courteous and conscious visitor if you seek out this magnificent waterfall – pack out whatever you bring with you and behave as you would in a guest’s home. We are privileged to have access to this waterfall and we should be grateful for the Abbey for being so willing to go to the lengths they saw necessary to continue to allow the public to visit.
Directions:
From the town of Scotts Mills, follow Crooked Finger Road for 10 3/4 miles (1.25 miles past the end of the pavement) and turn right on an unmarked road at a sign for an ORV area. Follow this road downhill, ignoring all spurs, for 2.25 miles to the end of the road at a gate and park. The road down is rough and steep in places and is not well suited to low clearance vehicles. From the end of the road, walk 100 feet back along the road to the trail which leads steeply downhill to the creek and falls in about 1/2 mile. The trail can be slick and muddy when its been raining so exercise caution when hiking downhill.
Latitude 44.92611 N
Longitude -122.56778 W
Elevation 1200 feet
Jenn’s View:  I would NEVER take my Honda Accord on this road. Glad we had Joyce’s SUV to get us through the stretch that would have killed my car. BUT I did see someone come down with a Subaru Outback type of car when we got back from this hike.
Great hike and short.  To get to the falls, it was less than a mile. The bad part is that its very steep.  Going down takes longer because the mud and rocks were quite slippery. Joyce and I fell and slipped a few times. 🙂 The climb back up was a breather but it always is if you don’t exercise on a daily basis, like I haven’t been. OOPS…did I just say that?  Saw a little girl on the trail going back to the car. Hey, if she can do it, so can a family.  Just exercise a lot of caution.  When I say it’s slippery, it’s slippery!
We found the gate to the trail and we actually started traveling ON that road past the gate.  Thank goodness I had the webpage on my phone and realized we were to park there and then walk back from where we drove and find the trail.  It looked like it was gonna rain on us but it didn’t. Thank goodness.
We found the first trail head and you are to pass that one and go on to the second trail.  You will recognize the trail with the sign that states that this is private property but has been given access for public use. Thank goodness for the Abbey Society of Oregon.  Is that a place for nuns???? If so, Thank you NUNS!  The climb down was pretty steep to begin with. When you climb down, take the trail to the right. Shortly, you will hear the creek.
Not really sure what Kaila was telling us but she looked pretty excited about it. ha ha
Why does my butt look so big??? Sheez! I really don’t have a butt so that is pretty amazing camera!
Don’t ask!
The sign that states the private property thingy. Too bad the flash went off or maybe we would have been able to read the darn thing!
The forest is pretty dense but the trail head is somewhat maintained and easy to see.  It was straight down hill so KNOWING that the climb back up was gonna get our hearts pumping!
 We reached the creek but in order to get down there, you had to follow the path straight down.  Pretty steep and looked like someone put a rope to climb down.  Pretty easy…I didn’t do the rope thing because I found a different path. Go figure. But Joyce and Makaila did it.
While taking this picture, I think Joyce fell…just standing there.
She would do excellent rock climbing!
After rope climbing down, you get to the creek! If you are facing the creek, follow it to the left (up stream)
Makaila went ahead of us and all I can hear is “MOOOOM! So pretty! Oh MOOOOOM!”
The rock wall is sooooo amazing.  I guess it’s basalt? Just absolutely beautiful! Great place to swim on a hot summer day! Makaila plans to bring her friends here some day and just have fun! We took some silly pictures too!

Overall, an absolute beautiful fall and short hike to get to.

So, while I was looking for local areas to hike and found this one, Bing showed me a picture that absolutely amazed me and made me want to do this hike.  I picked up the picture from here: http://pixdaus.com/pics/1264899655LQaejK9.jpg

Isn’t this just amazing?

Check out my May 2011 blog on Lower and Upper Butte Creek Falls.  This is less than a couple of miles down the road from this fall.  Great to see 3 falls in one day!!!

Here is a 360 video of the fall:

Opal Creek Wilderness – Opal Creek and Opal Pool (#)

OPAL CREEK AND OPAL POOL

May 29, 2011

Info: Thank you Oregon.com for the info!!! (http://www.oregon.com/Hike_Opal_Creek)

Difficulty: An easy 4-mile hike traverses the old-growth forest to 30-foot Sawmill Falls. A longer, 7.1-mile loop extends upriver to Opal Pool and Jawbone Flats, a Depression-era mining camp.

Season: Open all year, but the route may be snowy or icy after mid-winter storms.

Getting There: From Interstate 5 exit 253 in Salem, drive on East Santiam Highway 22 for 23 miles to Mehama’s second flashing yellow light. Opposite the Swiss Village Restaurant, turn left on Little North Fork Road for 15 paved miles and an additional 1.3 miles of gravel. At a fork, veer left on Road 2209. Then drive 4.2 miles to the locked gate. Residents of Jawbone Flats are allowed to drive the dirt road ahead; others must park and walk

Fees: A Northwest Forest Pass is required to park here. The pass costs $5 per day or $30 per season. (You can get a pass here ahead of time —  I get the annual pass — http://www.discovernw.org/store_national-forest-recreation-day-pass-national-forests-in-washington-and-oregon-only_09944.html)  It can be purchased at a ranger station, an outdoor store or at the trailhead fee box.

Hiking Tips: From the trailhead gate, the pleasantly primitive road crosses Gold Creek on a 60-foot-high bridge, skirts dramatic cliffs above the Little North Santiam River, and winds through an old-growth grove as impressive as any found farther upstream.

At the 2-mile mark, stop to inspect the rusting machinery of Merten Mill on the right. The mill operated briefly during the Depression, using winches from the battleship USS Oregon, but folded after two of the mill’s lumber trucks fell off the narrow canyon road. Now a camping area for backpackers, the mill site has one small empty building that can serve as emergency shelter. A short side trail behind the building leads to Sawmill Falls, a 30-foot cascade pouring into a deep green pool ideal for a chilly swim.

The route forks 0.2 mile beyond Merten Mill. Turn right across the river on a 100-foot bridge above a lovely gravel beach. The hike then follows the somewhat rough Opal Creek Trail left along the Little North Santiam River through woods where twinflower blooms and huckleberries ripen in July. After a mile, a sign points left 50 feet to Opal Pool’s scenic gorge.

To return on a loop, turn left, cross a footbridge at the head of Opal Pool, climb to an old mining road and keep left through Jawbone Flats, a well-preserved collection of 27 buildings dating from 1929-1932. Jawbone Flats has been donated to the Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center as an old-growth study center.

Respect the residents’ privacy by staying on the road. Dogs must be leashed here. On summer weekends, a tiny store in the settlement sells snacks, drinks and T-shirts. The center also includes several rentable cabins for $100-$300 that sleep 2-16 (for information call 503-897-2921 or check www.opalcreek.org).

An optional side trip for those who would to see more of Opal Creek begins at Opal Pool. When you reach the trail junction beside Opal Pool continue upstream 0.6 mile to a single-log footbridge. Along the way you’ll pass several small waterfalls. If you like, continue 0.9 mile upstream on a rougher trail to Cedar Flat’s trio of ancient red cedars, 500-1,000 years old. Near here, the Beachie Creek crossing, on a mossy log, is a good place to turn around. The trail peters out beyond this point.

Jawbones Flats is a Depression-era mining camp that now greets hikersHistory: Opal Creek’s ancient forest was thrust to fame in the 1980s by controversy over Forest Service logging proposals. National television crews and thousands of visitors hiked to Jawbone Flats’ rustic mining camp and scrambled over a rugged “bear trail” to view the endangered old-growth groves towering above this creek’s green pools. By the time Opal Creek finally won Wilderness protection in 1998 an improved path had been built to make the area more hiker-friendly. The new trail shortcuts from the Little North Santiam River to Opal Creek, making possible a loop trip to Opal Pool’s gorge and Jawbone Flats.

Geology: Miners at Jawbone Flats did not find commercial quantities of gold, and so they concentrated on nickel and other minerals instead.

Jenn’s View:I was wet and miserable. LOL. The only downside to the trail was that it was a “road” not a hiking through a forest type trail until you get to the bridge. It was a pretty interesting hike though. We did end up at an “old town” type of place and ate our Subway Sammich!  Just watch for the crazy shuttle van that transports people who rent the cabins from the parking lot. At times I wanted to hop on!  I know we encountered a mine but the entrance was blocked. 🙂

 

The Falls and the area were actually beautiful. I will try this hike again. It will be at the bottom of my list unless someone wants to shuttle me up to Opal Pool and then I will hike all of Opal Creek area 🙂

Here is the map I downloaded from Oregon.com. Same website that I got all that information from. So we started at the Lock Gate. I believe that’s the parking area. We “walked” on the road towards Opal Pool and hit the bridge. It was a very long walk but Joyce, Terri and I made it a blast.

We found a little area that we pretended (Okay, just Joyce) that she was looking for Edward Cullen from Twilight. She’s so silly.

Well, here are a few of my favorite shots:

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