Willamette National Forest (Detroit Lake Area) – Tumble Lake

Tumble Lake

TUMBLE LAKE

SEPTEMBER 1, 2013

INFO:  From the Oregon Hike Book by Sean Patrick Hill. From the edge of Detroit Reservoir, the Tumble Ridge Trail heads straight into the neighboring mountains, climbing steeply to the spire of Needle Rock and the vista of Dome Rock. Hidden up Tumble Creek is Tumble Lake, with a waterfall. Though you could hike in this way, there is an easier point of entry that makes for a quicker hike to these sights (which is what Scott and I did and this review is based on that direction to this easier hike). From the upper trailhead on Road 2223, go in 0.4 mile to a junction. To access Dome Rock, go left 0.5 mile to the 4,869-foot peak. To access Tumble Lake, go right at this first junction crossing a meadow down into a gully for 1.2 miles to the shore. Follow the shore to the left 0.3 mile to see the outlet creek and waterfall.

DIRECTIONS:  Drive 50 miles east of Salem on OR22 to Detroit Lake. Just before the Breitenbush River turn left on French Creek Road 2223 and go 4.2 miles to a fork at pavement’s end. (The road will initially split before the 4.2 miles and make sure to veer to the left. The road is super narrow so beware of oncoming cars/trucks) This is a picture of a pretty narrow part. My car (Honda Accord) is not that wide but it sure felt like it was a tight squeeze. Road to TumbleLake

At pavement’s end, fork left onto Road 2223 for 3.9 miles. It’s a good idea to watch your miles because there are no trail mark. We just found it because there were cars parked on the road and we saw a trail on the left. Permits are not required and parking and access is free.

JENN’S VIEW: Scott and I really enjoyed this trail. We have a 12-13 year old German Short-haired Pointer and a 6 year old tiny Maltese with us and they did better on the trail than I did! The climb back up was pretty brutal because it was a pretty steep incline. When we hit the lake, it was absolutely beautiful. So green and blue and very clear. Wish we had brought a raft to slowly drift around. Went looking for the waterfall but didn’t find it. I was a little bummed about that but give me a great reason to go back and do Dome Creek and then back to Tumble Lake. I was thinking of camping here next year. Scott promised to pack everything back up when we leave. Tee hee, I’m such a woos. I would say Pamelia Lake is prettier. You can get really pretty pictures with the mountain reflecting in the water. It’s flat and easier to get in to and tons of trails to hike around. Only problem with Pamelia Lake is that there is a limited access fee (not much $5 and can be ordered online) and must have a wilderness pass (another $5, I believe). Check that blog out here:  http://www.oregonhike.org/2011/06/mt-jefferson-pamelia-lake-9.html

The trail starts off with a small climb up. No big deal. The dogs were so excited to hit the trail. Too funny.  Scott being a “poser”. hahahahahaha….

Scott Wenger PoserThe first 0.4 miles is a steady climb up and you will actually see the sign to Tumble Lake. You will also see pretty cool rock spires (well that’s what I call them) and beautiful trees – Don’t ask, I normally don’t know what “type” of trees. It probably says it in my guide book but it’s late and I really don’t feel like getting out of my bed to check. LOL. Going to the left will take you to Dome Rock. We will hit that area next time  because its only 0.5 miles to the peak – I think. Then head down towards Tumble Lake after our OOOHHHH and AHHHH’s at Dome Rock.

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The next obstacle we faced was which way do we go? Follow what looks like a dry river bank. DO NOT FOLLOW THE TRAIL ON THE LEFT THAT LOOKS LIKE A TRAIL! Nor follow the flags that are on that trail. Scott and I sorta followed the flags and we eventually found our way out but we ended up on that dry river bed.

TumbleLake13Scott trying to figure out which flags to follow. We finally figured it out but it would have been easier to just follow the dry river bed!

_DSC0008After making our way out and on the right path, the climb down was a little hurtful on my poor little knees. It’s slippery too with loose rocks so be careful!

Tumble Lake

Eventually you will hit what my book calls a “meadow”. I guess. It’s a field of raspberry or some type of “prickly” bushes. Be careful – it hurts. I had to turn my capri pants back to regular pants. Man, I love those pants! Poor Scott was wearing shorts.

Tumble Lake

 After that, it’s a short walk to the lake. I just kept looking up thinking to myself how hard it is to climb back up! GRRRR, it’s gonna be brutal but after reaching the lake – the excitement of making plans to camp, raft, hike, etc all came about when we hit the lake. Sam, who is OLD OLD OLD dog, hates the water – actually jumped in the water. He loved it!

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We saw someone camping up near the rocks and one guy fishing in the lake on the other side. We didn’t stay too long because we had to get to a party that night.  We will definitely be back and with more time. Did I mention – the hike back is B.R.U.T.A.L.!

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Wouldn’t be a post without a picture of the one and only – MEEEEE!

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Opal Creek Wilderness – Henline Falls Trail

HENLINE FALLS

May 30, 2011

Info: Taken from the US Forest Service (http://www.fs.usda.gov) The trail meanders through young Douglas-fir and Western Hemlock forest. The trail ends at Henline Falls. Here you will find remnants of old mining from the 1930’s. A mine adit was built into the solid rock wall and goes back in about 1500 feet.

Directions: From Salem, travel East on Hwy 22 to milepost 23 at the Swiss Village Restaurant. Turn left on North Fork Road, which is marked “Little North Santiam Recreation Area”. Travel about 19 miles to forest road 2207 junction, continue past this junction for ¼ mile. Trailhead is on the left side.
This also provides access to Ogle Mountain Trail #3357 where it intersects with Henline Falls trail.

Jenn’s View: I really do like this hike. It’s real easy and quick so if I have the urge to do something close, I can go here. I would probably head up to Silver Creek Falls but it’s normally crowded so I don’t go there as much. Plus, if you are courageous enough you can go in the mine…I wouldn’t suggest going pass the barrier though. It freaked me out! All I can imagine is something crawling on the ceiling and then grab me and pull me in!

The first time I did this was with my daughter, Makaila Hunter.  She’s so funny and fun to hike with. Of course, I brought Shadowlynn with us and she was sporting her wonderful doggie backpack that carries nothing in it. It’s terrible to hold anything in it, I just use so I can spot her. 🙂 The Dog

You go through the woods and it’s a pretty flat area to hike into so the hike was pretty easy. Most of the pictures taken were when we reached the falls.

A couple of pictures of us. It wouldn’t be my blog without a picture of me :)!

We did manage to do another hike very close by. These pictures were taken with my camera phone and my ELPH camera. Unfortunately, my little ELPH broke.

Taken at river levelIt's Jenn

REVISIT: March 11, 2012
So, silly me decided to once again go hiking and be unprepared for snow. Gosh darn snow! Besides, Scott Wenger had my snow pants when we went skiing that last time I was in Sisters, Oregon. EEEK. First time skiing since 6th grade. Quite comical on skis. I think I should invest in snow shoes.

Here was my drive in. I drive a 4 door Honda Accord so any snow – blah for my car. I love my little car especially now that the gas price is over $4.00 a gallon so my SUV has to wait once again.

Sorry it’s such a dark picture but the settings of my camera were way off and I forgot to adjust them before taking the pictures.

There was another car parked in front of the sign so I know that someone else was on the trail. You would normally do the self issued pass that is located on the sign in the little box but there were none so I didn’t fill it out. Next time, I should leave a small pad of paper and see who would write on it to tell me about the trail. hmmmm…. SCIENCE EXPERIMENT!

To Henline Falls and Ogle Mountain

Most of the trail was covered in snow. Man, it would have been nice to have my snow pants, just saying….

You come to a fork in the road. To the right, that’s the trail to Ogle Mountain. I wouldn’t take that road just quite yet. It’s long and bit more difficult.

You know when you are on the right track when you come to the sign to Henline Falls

When you are on the trail, you will start hearing the water… At the end of the path is good ol’ Henline Falls

Wouldn’t be a blog without a picture of me….Isn’t that what I normally say?

Santiam State Forest – Abiqua Falls (#19 )

ABIQUA FALLS
Click on the picture to make it bigger!
October 23, 2011

Info:  (http://www.waterfallsnorthwest.com/nws/falls.php?num=4437) Abiqua Falls is a near-perfect free-falling waterfall of 92 feet in height set amid a spectacular basaltic amphitheater, framed by some of the best examples of columnar jointing that can be found in western Oregon. That the bedrock is basaltic has allowed various shades of moss and lichen to flourish in the canyon – with one section of the walls stained a bright orangeish-red by the growth in a similarly unique fashion as Latourell Falls in the Columbia River Gorge. The falls were the site of what was at one point thought to be a world record for the tallest waterfall run in a kayak. The kayakers who established the feat measured the falls at 101 feet tall, which differs from the measurement taken when reviewed for this database by 9 feet (though this is probably within an acceptable margin of error given the methods used, but it did not look like 100 feet to my eye). Abiqua Falls lies on land owned by the Mount Angel Abbey (rather than the surrounding Silver Falls Tree Farm as initially believed), who have graciously allowed public access to the falls. Between April and July of 2010 they had posted the land because of concerns about liability but as of the beginning of July 2010, they have once again opened the falls to access. Please remember to be a courteous and conscious visitor if you seek out this magnificent waterfall – pack out whatever you bring with you and behave as you would in a guest’s home. We are privileged to have access to this waterfall and we should be grateful for the Abbey for being so willing to go to the lengths they saw necessary to continue to allow the public to visit.
Directions:
From the town of Scotts Mills, follow Crooked Finger Road for 10 3/4 miles (1.25 miles past the end of the pavement) and turn right on an unmarked road at a sign for an ORV area. Follow this road downhill, ignoring all spurs, for 2.25 miles to the end of the road at a gate and park. The road down is rough and steep in places and is not well suited to low clearance vehicles. From the end of the road, walk 100 feet back along the road to the trail which leads steeply downhill to the creek and falls in about 1/2 mile. The trail can be slick and muddy when its been raining so exercise caution when hiking downhill.
Latitude 44.92611 N
Longitude -122.56778 W
Elevation 1200 feet
Jenn’s View:  I would NEVER take my Honda Accord on this road. Glad we had Joyce’s SUV to get us through the stretch that would have killed my car. BUT I did see someone come down with a Subaru Outback type of car when we got back from this hike.
Great hike and short.  To get to the falls, it was less than a mile. The bad part is that its very steep.  Going down takes longer because the mud and rocks were quite slippery. Joyce and I fell and slipped a few times. 🙂 The climb back up was a breather but it always is if you don’t exercise on a daily basis, like I haven’t been. OOPS…did I just say that?  Saw a little girl on the trail going back to the car. Hey, if she can do it, so can a family.  Just exercise a lot of caution.  When I say it’s slippery, it’s slippery!
We found the gate to the trail and we actually started traveling ON that road past the gate.  Thank goodness I had the webpage on my phone and realized we were to park there and then walk back from where we drove and find the trail.  It looked like it was gonna rain on us but it didn’t. Thank goodness.
We found the first trail head and you are to pass that one and go on to the second trail.  You will recognize the trail with the sign that states that this is private property but has been given access for public use. Thank goodness for the Abbey Society of Oregon.  Is that a place for nuns???? If so, Thank you NUNS!  The climb down was pretty steep to begin with. When you climb down, take the trail to the right. Shortly, you will hear the creek.
Not really sure what Kaila was telling us but she looked pretty excited about it. ha ha
Why does my butt look so big??? Sheez! I really don’t have a butt so that is pretty amazing camera!
Don’t ask!
The sign that states the private property thingy. Too bad the flash went off or maybe we would have been able to read the darn thing!
The forest is pretty dense but the trail head is somewhat maintained and easy to see.  It was straight down hill so KNOWING that the climb back up was gonna get our hearts pumping!
 We reached the creek but in order to get down there, you had to follow the path straight down.  Pretty steep and looked like someone put a rope to climb down.  Pretty easy…I didn’t do the rope thing because I found a different path. Go figure. But Joyce and Makaila did it.
While taking this picture, I think Joyce fell…just standing there.
She would do excellent rock climbing!
After rope climbing down, you get to the creek! If you are facing the creek, follow it to the left (up stream)
Makaila went ahead of us and all I can hear is “MOOOOM! So pretty! Oh MOOOOOM!”
The rock wall is sooooo amazing.  I guess it’s basalt? Just absolutely beautiful! Great place to swim on a hot summer day! Makaila plans to bring her friends here some day and just have fun! We took some silly pictures too!

Overall, an absolute beautiful fall and short hike to get to.

So, while I was looking for local areas to hike and found this one, Bing showed me a picture that absolutely amazed me and made me want to do this hike.  I picked up the picture from here: http://pixdaus.com/pics/1264899655LQaejK9.jpg

Isn’t this just amazing?

Check out my May 2011 blog on Lower and Upper Butte Creek Falls.  This is less than a couple of miles down the road from this fall.  Great to see 3 falls in one day!!!

Here is a 360 video of the fall:

Moutn Jefferson Wilderness – Whitewater Trail #3429 (#13)

I think they need to replace this sign
JEFFERSON PARK – WHITEWATER TRAIL #3429
August 13, 2011
  

So, it’s about 3:30-ish when I got back from the car from Cheat Creek and decided it’s still early enough to get to Jeff Park.  I’m thinking it’s about a 2.1 mile hike — Who the heck knows where I even got that figure in my head! Whitewater trail is approximately 10+miles round trip to the first lake.  That would take me more than 6 hours at the rate I was going with all my “poor Jennifer” excuses (neck/shoulder pain, knee pain, no exercising for almost a week, blah blah blah).  Found the parking area and this is where the Wilderness pass comes in.  Here is the map guide from Ranger Bob. It’s pretty crinkly because I kept looking at it to make sure I wasn’t heading in the wrong direction PLUS I used it as a barrier between my hand and the walking stick I found. LOL

On our way up, I was able to get beautiful pictures of Mt. Jefferson. It was closer in person and so beautiful. It makes me really appreciate Oregon!

The weather was perfect! About 75 degrees, clear skies.  In my head, I was thinking, “DANG – perfect day to do Table Rock to see all the mountain ranges” but glad I didn’t.

My water bladder was low and already drank all my Vitamin Water from Cheat Creek.  It was nice because it made my pack WAY lighter but was a little worried about Shadowlynn.  Kept filling up her water bowl and kept wanting more.  Was hoping to find any creeks or water beds for her to drink out of to help save what little water I had left. We did find a creek about 1.5 miles UP and was all happy once again.  We ate near the creek – the rest of my Subway Sammich, trail mix, and protein bar….felt so much better. I brought Dog Food for Shadowlynn so she was all happy and content too!

I think this is part of Whitewater?

Well stupid me NEVER stays on the trail.  Looked up and thought, “that looks like a great place to cut through.” HOPING it would lead me to a great view of the ridge. hmmm.  Nope, it didn’t.  Got turned around a little and noticed a trail so started following the trail not knowing which one I was on. Gimme a break — IT WAS A TRAIL!  After awhile, met the 2 backpacking girls that I met on Cheat Creek trail and said that this trail will lead you to that meadow…Ahhhh crap — was going the wrong way! Turned around and followed the same trail – opposite direction.  Glad I did.  Found these beautiful views along the way…

I seriously need to invest in a camera.  Would love to take one of these pictures, blow it up, frame it and put it on one of the walls…Well, hopefully on my next commission check I may be able to do that.  Plan to do this hike to the first lake within the next week or so and plan to “backpack/camp” next year with friends/family to do the FULL loop!

Willamette Valley – Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge (#3)

Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge
March 20, 2010
 Info: (taken from the US Fish and Wildlife website http://www.fws.gov/WillametteValley/baskett/): Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge is located in the fertile Willamette Valley of northwestern Oregon . The Refuge is situated in open farmland near the eastern foothills of the Coast Range , with the broad Willamette Valley and the Cascade Mountains to the east. Elevations range from 185 to 414 feet msl. The Willamette Valley , with its mild, rainy winter climate, is an ideal environment for wintering waterfowl. The Refuge consists of 1,173 acres of cropland, which provide forage for wintering geese, 300 acres of forests, 550 acres of grasslands, 500 acres of shallow water seasonal wetlands and 35 acres of permanent open water. As with the other refuges within the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Complex, the primary management goal of Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge is to provide high quality wintering habitat for geese, especially the dusky Canada goose, to ensure healthy, viable goose populations while minimizing goose browse damage to crops on private agricultural lands.
The Baskett Slough NWR also provides habitat for a wide variety of birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. Populations of several endangered and threatened animal and plant species can be found on the refuge. Wildlife/wildlands observation, photography, hiking, and environmental education and interpretation are the major public use activities allowed on the Refuge.
Directions: (taken from my book: Oregon Hiking) From Salem, follow Highway 22 to Rickreall, turn north on US 99 West for 1.8 miles, and turn left on gravel Colville Road 1.4 miles to the trailhead lot on the right.
Jenn’s View: Great easy hike for the family and great views of the refuge. Tons of birds but need binoculars to see anything. I think the best part of this hike was that a winery was very close by ;)The beginning of my hiking adventures. I was just getting over the flu/cold, so an easy hike was in order. My girlfriend, Terri Jacobe, came along and had a blast. Most of the trails were closed and wouldn’t re-open until April. The trail to the view of the Baskett Slough was open, so that’s the one that we did.

The trail was a steady climb up but not at all difficult. You get great views of the Willamette Valley and the coast range when you hit the top. The loop is approximately 1.5 miles. Go straight on the wide grassy path for 0.5 mile and then left at the junction up grass-topped Baskett Butte for the view. (quote from my book) If the refuge is open, you can continue straight into the refuge through a white oak forest another 0.4 mile to a junction and an old barn colonized by darting swallows. Going right takes you to the shores of Morgan Lake, a 1.4 mile walk to a gate, where you can return via an old road for another mile back to the barn, passing a small pond of cattails and the nutria.

When we got to the top, Terri and I thought we saw what looked like vineyards….OOOHHHH, you should have seen the look on my face! I think I had a big fat grin on my face! We completed the walk on the trail.

Found a hollow tree and Terri dared me to go in. I’m not dumb, I know there are tons of bugs in there..so she did it! Gotta love her!

Terri Jacobe being all silly

We hurried back down the trail to get back to my car so we can hunt for the winery. 🙂

Can you see the little ground squirrel? Well I think it’s a squirrel. He blends in pretty well in the grass

Well, I do recommend this hike for families. Wait for a nice clear day to see the Willamette Valley and the Coastal Range. Don’t do the hike in the rain because it gets pretty muddy and “sloushy” in some areas. The best part – go visit the winery! Sit on the porch and enjoy the views! I believe this was at Van Duzen Vineyard. What a great way to end the day though! I did end up buying a couple bottles of wine!

Terri Jacobe and I doing a little bit of wine tasting.
Around the corner was a sitting area.
The main goal of the picture was to show how pretty their tasting room is. NOT the big butt that dominates this picture.
I did end up picking up wine!

Since we were in a wine tasting mood, we hit another vineyard in West Salem area called Orchard Heights Winery. I love living around this area because of all the numerous vineyards that surrounds here! I haven’t hit them all, but one of these days, I will!